Saturday, October 19, 2019

Kouchigari compilation

Kouchigari is not my best technique but it was one of my most favorite teacher's most favorite throw though and I'm still working on it!  Here's to John Usher!



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Patrick Parker
www.mokurendojo.com

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Kosotogari compilation

Kosotogari is not only difficult to find competition film of, but it is also nearly indistinguishable from deashibarai when conditions are not perfect.  It seems like my students and I must use it a lot more than most folks because it makes a great backup plan when deashibarai goes bad.




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Patrick Parker
www.mokurendojo.com

Saturday, October 05, 2019

Seoinage compilation

Seoinage is not exactly my favorite throw but it is super effective and super-common in tournament play! These are some superb examples!




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Patrick Parker
www.mokurendojo.com

Saturday, September 28, 2019

Ouchigari compilation

Ouchigari is frequently successful in tournaments but it often looks clumsy.  There are some smooth and some clumsy examples on this compilation but they were all successful!




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Patrick Parker
www.mokurendojo.com

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

10 actors who were judoka

Judo has been popular with entertainers, artists, and actors, including...
  1. James Cagney
  2. Sonny Chiba
  3. George Harris
  4. Lucille Ball
  5. Melanie Chisholm (Sporty Spice)
  6. Ed Parker
  7. Gene LeBell
  8. Ronda Rousey
  9. Chuck Norris
  10. Peter Sellers


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Patrick Parker
www.mokurendojo.com

Sunday, September 22, 2019

Saturday, September 21, 2019

Ukigoshi compilation

Ukigoshi is really hard to find competition videos of.  This film contains a few seconds of instruction and 2-3 examples drawn from competition.  the slo-mo of the girls throwing it really highlights the beauty of this technique.




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Patrick Parker
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Friday, September 20, 2019

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

First 10 Judo 10th dans

First ten men to ever be promoted to 10th dan rank in Judo
  1. Yamashita, Yoshitugu (1865-1935) Promoted 10th Dan 1935
  2. Isogai, Hajime (1871-1947) Promoted 10th Dan 1937
  3. Nagaoka, Hidekazu (1876-1952) Promoted 10th Dan 1937
  4. Mifune, Kyuzo (1883-1965) Promoted 10th Dan 1945
  5. Iizuka, Kunisaburo (1875-1958) Promoted 10th Dan 1946
  6. Samura, Kaichiro (1880-1964) Promoted 10th Dan 1948
  7. Tabata, Shotaro (1884-1950) Promoted 10th Dan 1948
  8. Okano, Kotaro (1885-1967) Promoted 10th Dan 1967
  9. Shoriki, Matsutaro (1885-1969) Promoted 10th Dan 1969
  10. Nakano, Shozo (1888-1977) Promoted 10th Dan 1977

Although all of these men were Jigoro Kano's contemps, only the first three made Judan during Kano's lifetime.  Since 1977 there have been several notable promotions to the rank of Judan.  There were, of course, many notable judoka who never reached 10th dan.


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Patrick Parker
www.mokurendojo.com

Monday, September 16, 2019

Never force tori to prove his technique

One of the coolest things about judo is that it is real and honest.  Outcomes are objective instead of subjective and everything is executed to completion, as opposed to pulling punches that might or might not have been effective or simply dancing around the mat with a partner.)

  • either you are able to make the other person fall or you can't
  • either you can make the other guy submit or you can't
  • either you can escape the other guy's hold or you can't

But there is a paradox or a bind that beginners (and even some old-heads) don't ever understand - beginners should never force the other person to prove that they can do the technique and even experts should only do it judiciously.

We work with semi-compliant partners called "ukes" instead of "attackers" or resistant "opponents" for a couple of reasons:

  • It is better for students to get many repetitions of poor approximations of a technique than to get very few reps of still-poor approximations because their partner confounded every attempt (which is easy to do to a beginner).
  • It is safer for uke to take an appropriate fall at an appropriate time because eventually you will encounter someone who really is able to force you to fall against your will.  When that happens, you will want to have had a lot of falling practice!  Also, when you force tori to prove they can make you fall, you always end up eating more energy when you do hit the ground.

So uke does not confound tori's techniques - especially in nagekomi practice.  Instead, uke helps set up conditions for both a successful throw and a safe fall.

But how far does this compliance go?  At some point, you have to shift toward the "real" and "honest" mentioned earlier, right?

Eventually, after uke and tori have each experienced hundreds or thousands of repetitions of a technique, uke can gradually and judiciously start increasing the resistance - forcing tori to prove that he can take the technique when he wants it.

It is hard to figure this relationship out - especially if we start doing randori or shiai very early.  People get confused and want to prove or force their partner to prove techniques.

  • It can help if we clearly delineate how each person is to behave in each type of practice - uchikomi, nagekomi, randori, and shiai.
  • It can help if we teach explicitly-defined ukemi for each throw (tell uke exactly how to behave and how to fall when you are doing each particular technique.
  • It can help  if we shift our attention from tori to uke.  Make the techniques uke-centric by thinking about them as falling exercises.  That way, tori is not expected to prove that he can do a thing to uke.  Instead he is expected to help uke set up the conditions for a particular fall, and to help support uke like a spotter as uke does that fall a specific way.  So, nagekomi is just a form of ukemi practice.
  • It can help to make sure that everyone plays the roles of uke and of tori often.  Don't let the lower ranked students be throwing dummies for the upper ranks or the competitors.  Don't let the old fat guys get totally out of ukemi (though you might have to cut back some).

Once you get ukes and toris working together successfully in this manner for thousands of reps at a time, they can start dialing up the resistance incrementally.



Want to discuss this blog post?
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Patrick Parker
www.mokurendojo.com

Saturday, September 14, 2019

Osotogari compilation

Osotogari is one of those techniques that is probably taught in every martial arts class that there is because it is extraordinarily easy to force an unsuspecting opponent down with it.  What makes these examples of osotogari is they were done on other judoka who know that technique is coming and are watching for it and have some options for countering it!




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Patrick Parker
www.mokurendojo.com

Friday, September 13, 2019

Why is shomen-ate taught first?


In the first Tomiki aikido technique, shomenate, tori enters directly in front of uke and projects uke straight backwards by pressing on his face and stepping through him.
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But except for shomenate, aikidoka vastly prefer to be outside of uke's arms or behind his shoulder (shikaku).  In fact, it is not until techniques #13 (tenkai kotehineri) and #14 (shihonage) that we encounter the other two basic solutions to the problem of being caught directly in front of uke.
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So, why is shomenate taught first when it seems so contrary to the aikidoka's primary tactic of getting into the dead angle behind uke's arm?
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Because as Jagger-sensei says, "You can't always get what you want."
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Almost 100% of the time, an attacker will have desires contrary to your standing behind them ;-) so (especially while you are learning) you will often find that uke can easily spoil your techniques by turning to face you.
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Tomiki's teaching system places the main backup plan first because it solves so many problems.
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Basically, Tomiki's system is set up as if to say, "Always try to get behind uke, but if you find yourself toe-to-toe inside uke's arms and too close, your simplest, most effective solution is to push uke's face and stride directly through him. That is, whenever an attacker spoils your technique by turning to face you, do shomenate.
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Isn't it kind of neat that Tomiki-sensei gave us the answer to most problems first!?


P.S. incidentally, isn't it also neat that kumi-judo gives us another great back-up plan for aikido techniques that go bad because virtually everything in judo is done from toe-to-toe, between uke's arms, and close!?

P.P.S. isn't it also interesting that pressing the face as in shomenate is disallowed in judo competition?  Ostensibly this is for safety, but shomenate also spoils most of the conditions that are required for most judo techniques to work - that is, toe-to-toe, between uke's arms, and close.

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Want to discuss this blog post?
Come find me on Facebook at my Mokuren Dojo FB group

____________________
Patrick Parker
www.mokurendojo.com
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