New Schedule and Location for 2016

...

All in or all out

Another concept that JW Bode taught at the seminar in OKC this past week is that of being "all in or all out."  That is, at extreme long range (greater than about 2 arms lengths) the unarmed bad guy cannot harm you.  Also, at extreme close range when you are hugged right up against them it is more difficult for the bad guy to attack effectively.
.
It's the middle range (between about 0.5 arm length and 1.5 arm lengths) that's the killing field. You have to be all in or all out.
.
In the seminar we approached this problem from the perspective of having to move from the outside condition through the killing field to the inside condition in order to take control.  Typically in my classes we have worked this same problem backwards - that is, we tend to assume that the bad guy will want to be in middle-to-close range so we have to work to get behind the attacker, flow with them to stay safe until we can get an offbalance and/or throw, which will give us an option to move through the killing field to the outside condition.
.
In other words, with JW we worked this problem moving through the killing field to get all in, while we usually work this problem by moving through the killing field to get all out and escape.  (Turns out that the solution is the same in both approaches - use wrist releases to make yourself safer while moving through the killing field.)
.
I think these two actions are complementary.  Flip-sides of the same coin.  Facets of aikido. You must have both of these tactics in your repertoire.
.
But my question is... You have to train one or the other of these ideas to be your initial reflex, so which one should be your standard first action?  Which one of these should you train so much that it becomes your go-to tactic when stressed or frightened?
.
My guess is that tactical operators (police, military, etc...) must necessarily train to run toward the source of the problem and take control ("Seek safety in the mouth of the dragon.") and that civilians should train to create space and escape ("No be there") as their standard action.
.
And if that is so, then how much can we afford to train in the other mode before we begin spoiling our go-to reflex?
--
____________________
Patrick Parker
www.mokurendojo.com